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Little Loom House – Slice of the City

  East of Iroquois Park on Kenwood Hill Road sits a collection of cabins known as the Little Loomhouse. People of all ages interested in knitting, spinning, and, of course, looming are invited to participate in their activities and events. Originally built in the 1860s, the cabins can be hard to find, but now they’re no more than a Google search away.

The Loomhouse has a unique past worth sharing, as history has been made there. Most notably, the words to “Happy Birthday to You” were first sung by the Hill sisters in the Esta Cabin, the main building.

After the cabins had expanded from one to three, the property passed to Lou Tate, a nationally recognized master weaver who had grown up in Louisville, attending the Louisville Girls High School (which would later become duPont Manual High School) and the University of Louisville, among other institutions. Eleanor Roosevelt herself commissioned pieces from Tate.

Tate sought to make weaving more accessible and less time consuming. She set up her workshop in the cabins, creating a cultural art hub for local artists, musicians, writers, and weavers. In the 1960s, artists hung their creations in the trees as musicians played from the cabin rooftops. Though the Little Loomhouse no longer hosts these shows, they feature local artists and create a monthly exhibit about a significant historical event.

Along with afternoon classes, youth can attend summer camps that run alongside regular adult classes. To get involved, visit littleloomhouse.org. •

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About Kaelyn Harris

Kaelyn Harris is a junior at duPont Manual High School and a writer for On the Record. She loves playing cello, watching Studio Ghibli movies, and making friends with every cat she meets. When Kaelyn isn’t doing these things, she’s probably on Twitter fangirling over books.

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